Does an alkaline diet improve Crohn's symptoms?

Acid Alkaline Diet

Balance ph diet

Alkaline/Acid Food Charts from Essence of Life

The Acid Alkaline Diet from jeffwend on Squidoo
Green Drinks from jeffwend on Squidoo

"The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?" in Journal of Environmental and Public Health (2011)
Alkaline diets result in a more alkaline urine pH and may result in reduced calcium in the urine, however, as seen in some recent reports, this may not reflect total calcium balance because of other buffers such as phosphate. There is no substantial evidence that this improves bone health or protects from osteoporosis. However, alkaline diets may result in a number of health benefits as outlined below
(1) Increased fruits and vegetables in an alkaline diet would improve the K/Na ratio and may benefit bone
health, reduce muscle wasting, as well as mitigate other chronic diseases such as hypertension and strokes.
(2) The resultant increase in growth hormone with an alkaline diet may improve many outcomes from cardiovascular health to memory and cognition.
(3) An increase in intracellular magnesium, which is required for the function of many enzyme systems, is
another added benefit of the alkaline diet. Available magnesium, which is required to activate vitamin D, would result in numerous added benefits in the vitamin D apocrine/exocrine systems.
(4) Alkalinity may result in added benefit for some chemotherapeutic agents that require a higher pH.
From the evidence outlined above, it would be prudent to consider an alkaline diet to reduce morbidity and mortality of chronic disease that are plaguing our aging population. One of the first considerations in an alkaline diet, which includes more fruits and vegetables, is to know what type of soil they were grown in since this may significantly influence the mineral content. At this time, there are limited scientific studies in this area, and many more studies are indicated in regards to muscle effects, growth hormone, and interaction with vitamin D."

"Diet-induced acidosis: is it real and clinically relevant?" in Br J Nutr (2009)
Read the entire article here.
"The concept of diet-induced 'acidosis' as a cause of disease has been a subject of interest for more than a century. The present article reviews the history of our evolving understanding of physiological pH, the physiological support for the concept of 'acidosis', the causes of acidosis, how it is recognised, its short-term effects as well as the long-term clinical relevance of preventative measures, and the research support for normalisation of pH. Further, we suggest differentiation of the terms 'acidosis' and 'acidaemia' as a way to resolve the conflation of these topics which has led to confusion and controversy. The available research makes a compelling case that diet-induced acidosis, not diet-induced acidaemia, is a real phenomenon, and has a significant, clinical, long-term pathophysiological effect that should be recognised and potentially counterbalanced by dietary means."

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